Mental health challenges and illnesses are treatable. If you are concerned about yourself or someone you care about, here is some information on the most common mental health issues and a mental health services finder to assist you.

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Repeated exposure to stressful events can impact a child’s ability to manage emotions in a healthy way.

Be alert to possible signs of stressors in your young child:

  • Difficulty sleeping, eating or toileting
  • Frequent and severe tantrums
  • Delay in achieving milestones
  • Difficulty with transitions

What can contribute to mental health challenges?

  • Has the child’s home life changed in any significant way? This could include moving, having new people move into their home, or having people leave their home.
  • Is the child behaving as they usually do at home, in school, or in the neighborhood?
  • Has anything sad, bad, or scary happened to the child recently, or to you?

It’s okay to ask for help!

  • You can always talk to your pediatrician about your child’s behavior or any changes in your life.
  • Get help for yourself! You are the most important person in your child’s life.

Everyone feels sad, irritable or down sometimes. But if these feelings go on for a few weeks and you’re having a hard time dealing with them, you may suffer from depression.

You may be depressed if you:

  • Feel sad, irritable or angry most of the time
  • Feel hopeless or helpless
  • Feel like nothing is fun anymore and you don’t enjoy things you used to
  • Have trouble concentrating, making decisions or thinking clearly
  • Have no energy
  • Feel worthless or bad about yourself
  • Have no appetite, or overeat
  • Avoid friends or doing anything social
  • Have trouble falling asleep, wake up during the night, or sleep longer than usual
  • Have thoughts about ending your life

Consider talking to someone

If you are feeling down and need someone to talk to, reach out to a friend or trusted adult. You might find it helpful to talk to a counselor or a doctor. They can also help you decide if taking medication is appropriate.

There are things you can try on your own

  • Eat well
  • Get moving
  • Relax in some green space
  • Keep a feelings journal
  • Skip the drugs and alcohol

What can you do if you’re depressed?

If you think that you may be depressed, anxious, have trouble with alcohol or other drug use, or have another mental health issue, talk to your doctor or seek help from a mental health professional. For information and resources on depression and other mental health conditions, visit NYCTeen online www.nyc.gov/teen

Depression is more than just being sad from time to time. It is a potentially serious medical condition that can affect anyone.

It is important to know that depression is treatable. People can recover with help from medication, talk therapy, lifestyle changes and by learning new coping skills.

How can you tell if you are depressed?

Many people with depression are not aware that what they’re feeling is due to an illness. That’s why it is important to know the symptoms.

You may be depressed if you:

  • Feel persistently sad and tired
  • Feel hopeless or worthless
  • Lose interest in things you used to enjoy
  • Have problems with sleeping and your appetite
  • Have trouble concentrating, remembering or making decisions
  • Have thoughts of death or suicide

What can you do if you’re depressed?
If you think that you may be depressed, anxious, have trouble with alcohol or other drug use, or have another mental health issue, talk to your doctor or seek help from a mental health professional.

It’s normal to worry and feel anxious from time to time, especially when life is stressful. However, when anxiety becomes overwhelming and impacts your ability to function, it may be a sign of a generalized anxiety disorder.

Seeking help is important, because anxiety is treatable. Most people recover through a combination of medication, talk therapy, making lifestyle changes and learning new coping skills.

How can you tell if you have an anxiety disorder?

Symptoms vary, but you may have an anxiety disorder if you:

  • Persistently experience worry that is out of proportion to its cause
  • Feel irritable, restless and on edge
  • Find it hard to relax
  • Struggle with concentration (your mind “goes blank”), remembering things, and making decisions
  • Have problems with sleeping and eating
  • Tire easily
  • Sweat excessively
  • Feel nauseous
  • Experience headaches, muscle tension, and shaking
  • Experience a pounding or racing heart
  • Experience chest pain and tightness that feels like having a heart attack
  • Experience choking sensations and shortness of breath
  • Experience dizziness

What to do when anxiety and worry become overwhelming?

It is important to seek professional help for anxiety early on. Your symptoms are unlikely to go away on their own, and it’s likely that they’ll only worsen over time.

If you think that you may be depressed, anxious, have trouble with alcohol or other drug use, or have another mental health issue, talk to your doctor or seek help from a mental health professional.

Substance use disorders (addiction) are common and can have many negative consequences, including physical and mental health problems and difficulty meeting responsibilities at work, school, or home.

Changes to the brain associated with drug or alcohol use disorders can make a person crave the substance and continue to use despite the health and social problems substances may cause.

Substance use disorders are treatable. People can recover with help from treatment and support.

Treatment options vary, and include counseling and the use of medications such as methadone or buprenorphine. Treatment works best when it is tailored to the individual and takes into account not only substance use, but also other social, emotional, and health issues. Like other chronic diseases, substance use disorders can recur. Relapse is not a sign of personal failure but of the need to adjust treatment and provide additional support.

How can you tell if you need help?

  • You need alcohol and/or drugs to feel well. This can indicate a substance use disorder.
  • Friends and family tell you to cut down on your use.
  • You miss work or other commitments because of your alcohol and/or other drug use.
  • You experience negative consequences such as the loss of a relationship, a job or housing due to your alcohol and/or other drug use.

If you or a loved one’s alcohol and/or other drug use is becoming a problem, talk to a medical or behavioral health professional.

Most people will experience some form of traumatic event during their lifetime. This can be a personal event such as abuse, the death of a loved one, job loss or divorce. It could also include larger-scale events such as fire, neighborhood violence, natural disasters or a terrorist attack.

For almost all of us, traumatic events cause some degree of distress, fear and anxiety. But with the support of family and friends, most people manage to effectively cope with trauma.

Some people may develop mental health conditions as a result of their experience. Common conditions include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and substance use disorders.

People who have experienced multiple traumatic events and those with existing mental health conditions are at higher risk.

Like other mental health conditions, conditions resulting from trauma are treatable.

How can you tell if you need help?

If four weeks or more have passed since the traumatic events and you are experiencing any of the following conditions, you may need help:

  • You are still reliving the event and having frequent nightmares
  • You feel unable to perform basic daily activities
  • You are unable to enjoy life the way you used to
  • You still feel fearful and upset
  • You continue to have intense, distressing feelings
  • You try to cope in ways that cause additional problems, such as smoking or increased use of alcohol or drugs. 

What should I do when coping is difficult?

If you think that you may be depressed, anxious, have trouble with alcohol or other drug use, or have another mental health issue, talk to your doctor or seek help from a mental health professional.

If you think that you may be depressed, anxious, have trouble with alcohol or other drug use, or have another mental health issue, talk to your doctor or seek help from a mental health professional.

You can also find help by contacting NYC Well,a free, confidential helpline, available 24/7:

 Call: 1-888 NYCWell    or    Text: “WELL” to 65173

English: 1-888-692-9355
Spanish: 1-888-692-9355, Press 3
Chinese: 1-888-692-9355, Press 4

If you are in immediate danger of harming yourself or someone else, call 911.